Francesco Fiondella

Pronouns: He/Him

Associate Director, Communications and Special Projects, Communications, Columbia Climate School

Instructor, M.A. in Climate and Society

BIOGRAPHY:

Francesco has more than 15 years of experience in strategic science communication, visual communication,  and media relations. Since 2020, he has also been teaching courses at Columbia on science communication and strategic climate communication. He holds master’s degrees in both journalism and environmental science from Columbia University.

Before joining the Climate School communications team, Francesco was the head of communications for the International Research Institute for Climate and Society, where he used his writing and photography to convey how some of the world’s most vulnerable people struggle with the realities of climate, and what scientists are doing about it. 

He is especially interested in ways to bring science into the public sphere through collaborations with artists, photographers, and other cultural messengers. He is on the advisory board of Planet Forward. Before joining Columbia, Francesco worked as an information graphics editor and staff writer at The Wall Street Journal.

RECENT POSTS FROM STATE OF THE PLANET

Feb 14, 2024

Science for the Planet: Uncovering the Mysteries of Greenland’s Melting Ice Sheets

Marco Tedesco explains how remote-sensing data can reveal how Greenland's ice sheets are melting.

Feb 07, 2024

Science for the Planet: Equitable Climate Adaptation for Coastal Communities

Nadia Seeteram studies how climate risks are impacting housing infrastructure and housing needs in coastal communities.

Jan 31, 2024

Science for the Planet: Why We Need to Preserve Maritime Forests

Tree-ring scientist Nicole Davi explains the critical role maritime forests play in protecting our coastal communities from storms. The tree-ring records she's building will help us understand how these ecosystems are responding to climate change.

Jan 24, 2024

Science for the Planet: Why We Need Legal Frameworks for Carbon Dioxide Removal

Ocean-based techniques to remove carbon dioxide from the atmosphere could help the US and other countries reach their climate goals, but they need to be advanced in a safe, just and responsible manner, says climate law expert Romany Webb.